The Post Falls History Walk

Dr. G.O. Kildow

 

 

 

1894-1962

 

Mural Figure Sponsored by the

Governor’s Innovative Grant Award

& Hosted by French Cleaners

Corner of Spokane Street and 4th Avenue

 

Chemistry Graduate W.S.U.

World War I Veteran

Research Chemist

Classroom teacher, mathematics, physics, chemistry, advisor, administrator

Post Falls Schools

Nationally recognized education leader

President of North Idaho College

Family man, active in church

and community organizations

 

Written by Mrs. Graybill’s 2007-2008 4th Graders

 

with Assistance from Kimberly Rice Brown, Historian

 

 

          Dr. George Oliver (G.O.) Kildow affected many lives in Post Falls and beyond.  He was born in 1894 in Indiana.

 

He was a graduate of Washington State University in chemistry. He became a chemist.  During World War I *, he was assigned to the chemical warfare department, and worked with mustard gas. He had burns on his arms from his work.

 

        After the war, he became a research chemist for the Anaconda Mining Company in Montana, one of the largest copper mining companies in the world.  Then he decided to move to Spokane where he taught in a university. He taught chemistry and physics at Spokane University, and at schools in Montana and Idaho.   In 1929 he moved to Post Falls where he taught chemistry, physics, and mathematics.  He served as superintendent of Post Falls School District for several years. 

 

        During WWII, he trained many of the older students to drive school buses. When budgets and manpower were limited, he led the band, and coached the basketball team.  He operated kids’ summer camps at Newman Lake and Higgen’s Point on Lake Coeur d’ Alene. He believed that education should prepare children for the real world.

 

        In 1944, G.O. Kildow became president of North Idaho College.  He served there until his death in 1962.  He was a nationally recognized education leader in the junior college movement in the United States. A library at the Coeur d’ Alene campus was named in his honor.

 

 

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